We use cookies and other similar technologies (Cookies) to enhance your experience and to provide you with relevant content and ads. By using our website, you are agreeing to the use of Cookies. You can change your settings at any time. Cookie Policy.

Looking at what it's not got, rather than what it has, means you could miss the diamond in the rough

Let's pretend that it's time to elect a world leader. Here are some revealing facts about the three candidates: Candidate A associates with crooked politicians, and consults with astrologists; he's had two mistresses; chain smokes and drinks 8 to 10 martinis a day. Candidate B was kicked out of office, twice; sleeps until noon; used opium in college and drinks a quart of whiskey every evening. Finally, Candidate C is a decorated war hero; a vegetarian who doesn't smoke and only drinks an occasional beer and he has never had ANY extramarital affairs. Who gets your vote? Would it surprise you to discover that Candidate A is Franklin D. Roosevelt; Candidate B is Winston Churchill and Candidate C is Adolph Hitler? All very interesting but what has this got to do with FIPS, encryption or security generally? It proves the point you shouldn't judge a book by its cover.



There are numerous organizations who, when looking for a new solution, will draw up a list of attributes products must have to proceed to the evaluation phase. FIPS accreditation, CAPS and CESG all appear regularly on this list of must haves, especially for government bodies. They're obviously very important but do you know what these acronyms really mean?

Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS), according to Whatis.com, are a set of standards that describe document processing, encryption algorithms and other information technology standards for use within non-military government agencies and by government contractors and vendors who work with the agencies. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued the FIPS 140 Publication Series to coordinate the requirements and standards for cryptographic modules which include both hardware and software components for use by departments and agencies of the United States federal government. FIPS 140-2 defines four levels of security, simply named "Level 1" to "Level 4." It does not specify in detail what level of security is required by any particular application. A word of warning, FIPS 140 does not purport to provide sufficient conditions to guarantee that a module conforming to its requirements is secure, still less that a system built using such modules is secure.

CESG is the Information Assurance (IA) arm of GCHQ and is the Government's National Technical Authority for IA responsible for enabling secure and trusted knowledge sharing, which helps its customers achieve their aims. CESG aims to protect and promote the vital interests of the UK by providing advice and assistance on the security of communications and electronic data. CAPS helps private sector companies to develop cryptographic products for use by HMG and other appropriate organizations. CAPS links the cryptographic knowledge of CESG (the national technical authority for information assurance) with the private sector's expertise and resources.

-1-

1  2  

   Next Page

Explore Our Topics

  • EDITOR'S BRIEFING
  • Virtual Conferences
  • Webinars
  • Roundtables

BPM in Action

March 10, 2011

The sixth annual BPM in Action 2011 Virtual Conference will explore cutting-edge market developments in BPM and describe how to leverage them for improved business operation and performance. More

View All Virtual Conferences

Smart Case Management: Why It's So Smart.

Date:Nov 05, 2009
Time:12:00 PM ET- (17:00 GMT)

REGISTER TODAY!

Date:Oct 29, 2009
Time:15:00 PM ET- (19:00 GMT)

REGISTER TODAY!
View All Roundtables
  • Research Library
  • Podcasts
  • News

Joe McKendrick: Part II of II: Designing Evolve-ability into SOA and IT Systems

In part two of Joe McKendrick's recent podcast with Miko Matsumura, chief strategist for Software AG, they talk about how SOA and IT systems need to change and grow and adapt with the organization around it.

Listen Now

Phil Wainewright: Helping Brands Engage with Social Media

Phil Wainewright interviews David Vap, VP of products at RightNow Technologies, and finds out how sharing best practices can help businesses understand how best to engage with online communities.

Listen Now

Peter Schooff: Making Every IT Dollar Result in a Desired Business Outcome: Scott Hebner of IBM Rati

Scott Hebner, Vice President of Marketing and Strategy for IBM Rational, discusses a topic on the top of every company's mind today: getting the most from IT investments.

Listen Now

Jessica Ann Mola: Where Will BI Fit In? Lyndsay Wise Explains

In BI, this tough economy and the increasing role of Web 2.0 and MDM are certainly topics on people's minds today. WiseAnalytics' Lyndsay Wise addresses each of them in this informative podcast.

Listen Now

Dennis Byron: Talking with...Deepak Singh of BPM Provider Adeptia

Deepak Singh, President and CTO of Adeptia, joins ebizQ's Dennis Byron in a podcast that gets its hand around the trend of industry-specific BPM.

Listen Now
More Podcasts
  • Most Popular
  • Quick Guide
  • Most Discussed

Quick Guide: What is BPM?

Learn More

Quick Guide: What is Event Processing?

Smart event processing can help your company run smarter and faster. This comprehensive guide helps you research the basics of complex event processing (CEP) and learn how to get started on the right foot with your CEP project using EDA, RFID, SOA, SCADA and other relevant technologies. Learn More

Quick Guide: What is Enterprise 2.0?

A lot of people are talking about Enterprise 2.0 as being the business application of Web 2.0 technology. However, there's still some debate on exactly what this technology entails, how it applies to today's business models, and which components bring true value. Some use the term Enterprise 2.0 exclusively to describe the use of social networking technologies in the enterprise, while others use it to describe a web economy platform, or the technological framework behind such a platform. Still others say that Enterprise 2.0 is all of these things. Learn More