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ebizQ's Business Agility Watch

Jessica Ann Mola

Windows XP still hot, but enterprises "slowly warming" to Vista

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Microsoft's Windows XP is still the preferred operating system of western enterprises, no question. But a new study suggests Windows Vista may have finally worked its way into the hearts of IT managers in North America and Europe.

Microsoft first launched Vista over two years ago, eliciting an admittedly lukewarm response from both enterprises and individual consumers. However, a report released last Friday by Forrester Research suggests Vista usage is actually on the rise -- slightly.

According to the Jan. 30 report, "Enterprises Warming To Windows Vista," "Thirty-one percent of IT decision-makers reported that they have already begun their migration, and Windows Vista is now powering just fewer than 10 percent of all PCs within enterprises."

Forrester analyst Benjamin Gray and colleagues surveyed 962 IT decision-makers at North American and European companies with more than 1000 seats. Over a quarter of the respondents represent organizations of 20,000 employees or more.

The research firm's report summary continues: "Despite considerable interest in Windows 7 -- Windows Vista's eventual successor that's slated for release in early 2010 -- Windows Vista is finally shaping out to be the operating system that dethrones Windows XP." Well, only time will tell if this comes true.

IT managers are gearing up for the problems that will inevitably arise from supporting dual-OS environments of XP and Vista. Says the report, "some recognize it will only get worse as they are required to more broadly support Macs, Linux, and even consumer PCs as a result of Tech Populism's impact on the client domain."

ZDNet's Ed Bott posits that "Microsoft's well-executed development of Windows 7 might be a big part of the reason" for Vista's sudden spike in popularity.

Says Bott: "The same management team that is doing so well with Windows 7 is also in charge of keeping Vista running. By hitting a steady series of public milestones with Windows 7, Windows boss Steven Sinofsky is restoring corporate confidence in Microsoft's ability to ship software on a reliable schedule with predictable quality. That confidence makes it easier for IT pros to conclude that the early troubles with Vista were a temporary glitch and not a sign of things to come."

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By hitting a steady series of public milestones with Windows 7, Windows boss Steven Sinofsky is restoring corporate confidence in Microsoft's ability to ship software on a reliable schedule with predictable quality.

ebizQ’s expert blog team covers a broad range of BPM, business integration, business analytics/monitoring, collaboration, content and related issues.

Peter Schooff

Peter Schooff is Contributing Editor at ebizQ, and manager of the ebizQ Forum. Contact him at pschooff@techtarget.com

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